Logical Reasoning - Statement and Assumption - Discussion

In each question below is given a statement followed by two assumptions numbered I and II. You have to consider the statement and the following assumptions and decide which of the assumptions is implicit in the statement.

Give answer

  • (A) If only assumption I is implicit
  • (B) If only assumption II is implicit
  • (C) If either I or II is implicit
  • (D) If neither I nor II is implicit
  • (E) If both I and II are implicit.

19. 

Statement: The State Government has abolished the scheme of providing concessional air ticket to students.

Assumptions:

  1. Students will not travel by air in future.
  2. The students who resort to travel by air can bear the expenses of air ticket.

[A]. Only assumption I is implicit
[B]. Only assumption II is implicit
[C]. Either I or II is implicit
[D]. Neither I nor II is implicit
[E]. Both I and II are implicit

Answer: Option B

Explanation:

The scheme has been abolished not to discourage the students from travelling by air but keeping in mind that the abolition of scheme won't stop them from travelling by air. So, only II is implicit.

Chaitu said: (Sep 4, 2012)  
"But keeping in mind that the abolition of scheme won't stop them from travelling by air". It can't be guessed at any cost. Because the reasons may be many, nt ly, the given reason. It should be option[d]. Na?

Mdamirkhan said: (Jan 18, 2014)  
Which about do you like air ticketing and what is the meaning of air ticketing?

Ranju said: (May 31, 2016)  
It doesn't necessarily imply "The students who resort to travel by air can bear the expenses of air ticket".

The action of the government may have been due to some other financial difficulties, not necessarily because students can afford.

The Government may have directed the funds to say disaster relief or emergency or war.

Some Education In Formal Logic. said: (Aug 16, 2016)  
Universal quantifier ranging over an empty domain of discourse gives a trivially true output. So I suppose you could say that it is implicit.

In the case that at least one student takes a flight, it is a necessary condition that he can afford it, hence the assumption is satisfied. If no student takes a flight, all students who did take a flight (that is none), could afford it.

Which is the trivially true output of the universal quantifier, ranging over the empty domain of discourse that is students who took a flight? The domain of discourse can never be the empty set, we must have "Something" to talk about, though we cannot say anything about it. Hence the oddity here. Simply stated: the no students that took the plain could afford it is true.

Rsr said: (Oct 4, 2016)  
I think, neither l nor ll is implicit.

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