Mechanical Engineering - Thermodynamics - Discussion

21. 

Carbonisation of coal consists of

[A]. drying and crushing the coal to a fine powder
[B]. moulding the finely ground coal under pressure with or without a binding material
[C]. heating the wood with a limited supply of air to temperature not less than 280°C
[D]. none of the above

Answer: Option D

Explanation:

No answer description available for this question.

Akram said: (Jan 11, 2013)  
The destructive distillation of bituminous coal, done in the absence of air in order to obtain coke and other fractions having a greater percentage of carbon than the original material.

Dhanbhadra said: (Feb 5, 2013)  
When coal is strongly heated continuously for 42 to 48 hours in the absence of air in a closed vessel, the process is known as carbonisation of fuel.

Satheshkumar said: (Feb 23, 2013)  
Carbonization or carbonisation is the term for the conversion of an organic substance into carbon or a carbon-containing residue through pyrolysis or destructive distillation. It is often used in organic chemistry with reference to the generation of coal gas and coal tar from raw coal.

Vallagi Nagraj said: (Mar 14, 2013)  
Carbonization of coal consists of heating of coal to the the temperature as high as 1100*C in the absence of oxygen in order to distill out tars & light oils.

Suusanta said: (Mar 31, 2013)  
When coal is strongly heated continuously for 42 to 48 hours in the absence of air in a closed vessel, the process is known as Carbonisation.

Sonagra Nirav said: (Jun 26, 2013)  
The conversion of an organic substance into carbon or a carbon-containing residue through pyrolysis or destructive distillation is called as Carbonisation of coal.

Abhishek Chauhana said: (Aug 5, 2013)  
Conversion of organic substance into carbon. Carbonisation is destructive distillation of bituminous coal, done in the absence of air in order to obtain coke and other fractions having a greater percentage of carbon than the original material.

Amruta said: (Dec 8, 2013)  
Carbonisation is the term for the conversion of an organic substance into carbon or a carbon-containing residue through pyrolysis or destructive distillation.

Himmat said: (Dec 27, 2013)  
Heating of coal in absence of oxygen to extract some kinds oils out from coal.

Hardik said: (Mar 17, 2014)  
Gaining carbon from any organic substance is termed as carbonisation.

Shiv said: (Aug 7, 2014)  
When coal is strongly heated continuously for 42 to 48 hours in the absence of air in a closed vessel, the process is known as Carbonisation.

Lavanya said: (Aug 23, 2014)  
When coal is strongly heated continuously for 42 to 48 hours in the absence of air in a closed vessel, the process is known as Carbonisation.

Veera said: (May 31, 2015)  
It is the process, which converted organic matter into highly carbon, nothing but coke.

Miracle said: (Jan 10, 2016)  
It nothing but Gasification, or Syngas or producer gas now a day coal with low grade converting into gas and using for boiler furnace.

Bagish said: (Oct 2, 2017)  
When the coal is heated continually with 42-48 hr in the absence of air for the formation of coke in a closed vessel or destructive distillation of bituminous coal is known as carbonization.

Pradeep Gk said: (Oct 10, 2017)  
When coal is strongly heated continuously for 42 to 48 hours in the absence of air in a closed vessel, the process is known as Carbonisation.

Option A is pulverised coal.

B is Briquatted coal.

C is Wood charcoal.

Surendra Naidu Sr said: (Dec 14, 2017)  
Carbonization (or carbonisation) is the term for the conversion of an organic substance into carbon or a carbon-containing residue through pyrolysis or destructive distillation. It is often used in organic chemistry with reference to the generation of coal gas and coal tar from raw coal.

Aliyu Zaid said: (Dec 31, 2017)  
The destructive distillation of coal (as in oven).

Manish said: (Jun 11, 2019)  
Carbonization is a process where coal is heated in the absence of air.

Example in coke oven, by using this process to make coke into coal.

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