Mechanical Engineering - Heat Transfer, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning - Discussion

49. 

The relative humidity decreases as air gets wet.

[A]. True
[B]. False

Answer: Option A

Explanation:

No answer description available for this question.

Krishna said: (Jan 28, 2014)  
The relative humidity is the measure of moisture in air at any given temperature and pressure, so when the air gets wet, Rh should increase, not decrease.

Mohamed Alayoubi said: (Feb 9, 2015)  
Yes the relative humidity by sense increasing when the air get wets.

Hemant said: (Mar 1, 2015)  
Correct RH increasing as air gets wet.

Harry said: (May 24, 2015)  
%RH increases air gets wet, %RH decreases air gets dry.

Ram Shankar.R said: (Jul 2, 2015)  
Relative humidity decreases when the air gets wet. It can be noticed in winter season, during winter season the heat pump supplies hot and humidified air.

Kishan said: (Aug 24, 2015)  
What is the answer & please give explanation?

Parwez Akhter said: (Feb 17, 2016)  
RH increases.

Dinesh said: (May 4, 2016)  
Is this also true for adiabatic saturation?

Please clarify it.

Shabarish Kumar said: (May 6, 2016)  
Answer should be false. Because the air gets wet where RH is increases.

Heisesnberg said: (Aug 14, 2016)  
The answer is true because relative humidity tells about an amount of water vapor present and not on the amount of liquid present. So as the air gets wet it decreases water vapor but increases liquid quantity so the given answer is correct.

Biju Krishnanankutty said: (Aug 30, 2016)  
Relative humidity is a measure of the amount of water droplets in the air, as air get wet means the amount of water particle increases. So RH increases.

Sachin Mohite said: (Oct 2, 2016)  
Relative humidity is about the quantity of water vapour dissolved in air. When air gets wet, part of vapour gets converted into liquid water. Thus the quantity of water vapour left in air decreases. So, the relative humidity decreases.

Udbhvi said: (Dec 16, 2016)  
It is Increased.

Puneet said: (Jan 18, 2017)  
Relative humidity means Dry Bulb temp. It simply means outside air temp.

So, wet air means low temp which means low dry bulb temp, ie low humidity.

Danish said: (Jan 24, 2017)  
The answer is true because relative humidity tells about an amount of water vapor present and not on the amount of liquid present.

So as the air gets wet it decreases water vapor but increases liquid quantity so the given answer is correct.

Animesh said: (Oct 27, 2017)  
Please follow Psychometric chart, RH must increase.

Abhishek said: (Dec 27, 2017)  
Humidity - It is the amount of water vapor present in air, when the air gets wet water vapor decreases & air gets hot water vapor increases.

Abhinav Chikate said: (Mar 3, 2018)  
If air is getting wet that means the moisture content is increasing, which eventually results in increased relative humidity.

Rushang Surani said: (Jun 12, 2018)  
Relative humidity is about quantity of water vapour dissolved air. When air gets wet, part of vapour gets converted into liquid water. Thus quantity of water vapour left in air decreases. So relative humidity decreases.

Ajay said: (Aug 2, 2018)  
No, The Relative humidity should increase.

Aniruddhsinh said: (Jan 27, 2019)  
The answer is A because, if air got wet then convert into the liquid and air become dry. Example like Winter.

Anonymous said: (Feb 8, 2019)  
The relative humidity is the amount of water vapor the air is holding right now as a percentage of what it would be holding if it were saturated. If relative humidity is 20 percent, for example, the air contains 20 percent of the water vapor that it could potentially hold at that temperature. If you increase the temperature, however, the amount of water vapor the air can hold increases, so the relative humidity decreases.

Vin said: (Mar 14, 2019)  
What is the relative humidity if air is 100% saturated? If the answer is 1 relative humidity should increase as it gets wet, right?

Boyka said: (Jul 6, 2019)  
If we check the psychrometric chart, it should actually increase.

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