Mechanical Engineering - Automobile Engineering - Discussion

Discussion Forum : Automobile Engineering - Section 1 (Q.No. 1)
1.
The condition that causes vapour locking in a brake system is
overheating of the fluid due to frequent brake application
overcooling of the brakes during high speed driving
keeping the vehicle without use for an extended period
an excessively high engine speed on a downhill road
Answer: Option
Explanation:
No answer description is available. Let's discuss.
Discussion:
30 comments Page 1 of 3.

Sangappa jalihal said:   10 months ago
@ALL.

Present days the fluid systems are increased to stable the heavy heat resistance. Incase of vapour locking the fluid gets very fast time take to the original state.

Give me some examples to present vehicles if fassible?

Praveen said:   3 years ago
Vapor locking due to air in the system is possible and high temperature.

Manoj kumar majhi said:   4 years ago
Every brake fluid has designed with his stream temperature absorbing capacity when its crossed then it goes towards vapour then locking system for a break is occur.

Vijay said:   4 years ago
Braking generates considerable heat and to resist these high temperatures without boiling, brake fluid is designed with a high boiling point. But brake fluid is also hygroscopic, which means it absorbs water. In any hydraulic brake system, the brake fluid gradually absorbs moisture and this reduces the brake fluid's boiling point. Once this moisture absorption reaches a certain level "under prolonged, hard braking, especially in hot weather or heavy loads " the heat can cause the brake fluid to start to boil, creating gas bubbles. As gas is far more compressible than liquid, the driver will experience no pressure at all on the brake pedal, resulting in total loss of brake power known as vapour lock.

Konda said:   4 years ago
Brake fluid like many other fluids expands under severe and continuous pressure and this give rise to the formation of vapour due to rise in temperature and the resultant effect is that it make brakes ineffective due to vapour lock.

RAMDEV said:   5 years ago
In present-day Cars Vapour Lock in Brake system is a distant possibility, might be in Heavy Commercial vehicles it can happen but not sure.

Theophilus Zogblah said:   5 years ago
Brake fluid like many other fluids expands under severe and continuous pressure and this give rise to the formation of vapour due to rise in temperature and the resultant effect is that it make brakes ineffective due to vapour lock.

Govind said:   5 years ago
It is possible when the whole brakes lines are unfilled, with the full filled the brakes lines a small quantity of air is in it because brakes lines have narrow size. To comes out the air from brake line, first filled the brake line, then the end of the brakes lines is slight loss the applied the 3or 4 time the air from the lines comes out. There is no another case locking of vapour or air in brakes lines.

Rumit Bodhe said:   6 years ago
Most of the braking fluid contains glycol fluid. It is hygroscopic fluid. The conversion of water in the brake fluid to steam when the brakes are heated significantly which causes compressibility in the brake system. This vapour lock leads to increased pedal travel and can result in a significant loss of brake effect.

Nityanand haldar said:   6 years ago
Please clarify the concept of vapour lock.

Whether it occurs due to temp rise by frequent operation of the system or by hygroscopic nature of brake fluid? Or both?


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