Electronics - Voltage and Current - Discussion

32. 

The charge of one coulomb is equal to:

[A]. 6.24 x 10−18 electrons
[B]. one ampere
[C]. one second
[D]. 6.24 x 1018 electrons

Answer: Option D

Explanation:

No answer description available for this question.

Mr. Mitchell said: (Mar 24, 2011)  
The coulomb unit is 6. 25x10^18 in the electronics fundamentals fifth edition.

Pandu said: (Jun 1, 2011)  
1e=1.6*10^-19columbs.
So , 1q=1/(1.6*10^-19)electrons.
So q=6.25*10^18 electrons.

Praveen Thappily said: (Jun 3, 2011)  
The charge of one electron = 1.6 x 10^-19C

Therefore, to make a charge of 1C, we need 1/ 1.6 x 10^-19 = 6.25 6 x 10^18 electrons.

Shubhangi said: (Mar 6, 2014)  
Sir, value of one coulumb constant or variable. Please tell right answer.

Suracece said: (Jan 2, 2015)  
1 coulumb = 1.602*10^18 electrons.

Pavitra said: (Feb 20, 2015)  
Yes the value of one coulomb is constant.

1 coulomb = 6.25*106^18 electron.

Joseph Ramki said: (Jul 14, 2015)  
All atoms electron contains 1.6x10 power -19c charge only? Please clear my doubt!

Gopala Krishna said: (Dec 29, 2015)  
No. of electrons = ?

Charge (C) = 1 charge in one electron = 1.6*10^-19.

So, n = Q/e = 1 C/1.6*10^-19 = 6.25810^18.

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