Civil Engineering - Building Materials - Discussion

2. 

Most commonly used solvent in oil paints, is

[A]. petroleum
[B]. spirit
[C]. coaltar
[D]. turpentine.

Answer: Option A

Explanation:

No answer description available for this question.

Shivam said: (Jul 21, 2015)  
But why not Turpentine?

Saajan said: (Oct 22, 2015)  
It should be turpentine.

Anuj said: (Aug 4, 2016)  
Spirit of turpentine (turpentine) are used.

Hind said: (Sep 15, 2016)  
Yes, the answer is turpentine.

Hash said: (Sep 28, 2016)  
Petrol and turpentine both are the correct answer.

Ranjay Kumar Pandey said: (Nov 3, 2016)  
Turpentine is the correct answer.

Anup said: (Nov 14, 2016)  
Oil paint is a type of slow-drying paint that consists of particles of pigment suspended in a drying oil, commonly linseed oil. The viscosity of the paint may be modified by the addition of a solvent such as turpentine or white spirit, and varnish may be added to increase the glossiness of the dried oil paint film.

Sanjay Maurya said: (Feb 8, 2017)  
It is Turpentine.

Arpit said: (Feb 17, 2017)  
Petroleum is correct. I agree.

Kartik Jagwani said: (Mar 18, 2017)  
@ALL.

This question asked in NMRC entrance exam.

But the answer given was varnish. Where the options are turpentine, varnish, petroleum, coal, tar.

So which is correct option?

Laxman Keshari said: (Mar 20, 2017)  
Ofcourse, turpentine.

Oil paint is a type of slow-drying paint that consists of particles of pigment suspended in a drying oil, commonly linseed oil. The viscosity of the paint may be modified by the addition of a solvent such as turpentine or white spirit, and varnish may be added to increase the glossiness of the dried oil paint film.

Shiney said: (Apr 7, 2017)  
Turpentine is the correct answer.

Ravi Shankar Keshari said: (Jul 7, 2017)  
Turpentine is the correct answer.

Shubham Singh said: (Jul 23, 2017)  
Turpentine, once the common solvent for oil paints, is rarely used, having been replaced by the White Spirit also known as mineral turpentine (AU/NZ) , turpentine substitute, petroleum spirits.

Kuldeep Adiwal said: (Jul 27, 2017)  
Turpentine is the right answer.

Amit Saini said: (Oct 6, 2017)  
@All.

The right answer is PETROLEUM.

Turpentine is the traditional solvent used in oil painting. It's based on tree resin and has a fast evaporation rate.

Praful Sl said: (Nov 12, 2017)  
The point comes here is economic so turpentine is right answer.

Muhammad Sajid said: (Mar 7, 2018)  
It is turpentine.

Ref: Engineering material book written by Surendra Singh.

Sayed Abrar said: (Mar 28, 2018)  
Oil paint is a type of slow-drying paint that consists of particles of pigment suspended in a drying oil, commonly linseed oil. The viscosity of the paint may be modified by the addition of a solvent such as turpentine or white spirit, and varnish may be added to increase the glossiness of the dried oil paint film.

Viru Kapoor said: (Apr 3, 2018)  
It is both petroleum and turpentine.

Petroleum product Neptha also used as thinner/solvent in the oil paints.

Lakhan Singh said: (Apr 13, 2018)  
Answer is (D) turpentine.

Ref: p-424 S.K.D.

Joydeep said: (Jul 9, 2018)  
Turpentine or white spirit, and varnish may be added to increase the glossiness of the dried oil paint film.

Manish said: (Jul 16, 2018)  
It is Commonly used Solvent in Paints is turpentine.

Pankaj said: (Jul 22, 2018)  
It's turpentine.

Syed Aftab Ali said: (Apr 30, 2019)  
Accordingly, it is Turpentine commonly used. But in some cases, it is where the dry condition is not satisfactory then we used Petrol.

Pandu said: (May 27, 2019)  
Most commonly used solvent in oil paints, is turpentine.

But, Most commonly used solvent in oil paints, is petroleum.

Shahswat Singh said: (Nov 30, 2019)  
The most commonly used solvent is the spirit of turpentine.
Ref - Rangwala.

Priya said: (Jan 6, 2020)  
Naphtha is a petroleum solvent.

Hzisis said: (Feb 8, 2020)  
Turpentine is thinner not solvent.

Bangash said: (Feb 22, 2020)  
Turpentine is thinner.

Golu Lodha said: (May 9, 2020)  
Yes, D is correct. I too agree.

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