Online Java Programming Test - Java Programming Test 2



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Instruction:

  • Total number of questions : 20.
  • Time alloted : 30 minutes.
  • Each question carry 1 mark, no negative marks.
  • DO NOT refresh the page.
  • All the best :-).

1.

Which of the following class level (nonlocal) variable declarations will not compile?

A.
protected int a;
B.
transient int b = 3;
C.
private synchronized int e;
D.
volatile int d;

Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

Correct Answer: Option C

Explanation:

Option C will not compile; the synchronized modifier applies only to methods.

Option A and B will compile because protected and transient are legal variable modifiers. Option D will compile because volatile is a proper variable modifier.

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2.

What will be the output of the program?

public class ArrayTest 
{ 
    public static void main(String[ ] args)
    { 
        float f1[ ], f2[ ]; 
        f1 = new float[10]; 
        f2 = f1; 
        System.out.println("f2[0] = " + f2[0]); 
    } 
}

A.
It prints f2[0] = 0.0
B.
It prints f2[0] = NaN
C.
An error at f2 = f1; causes compile to fail.
D.
It prints the garbage value.

Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

Correct Answer: Option A

Explanation:

Option A is correct. When you create an array (f1 = new float[10];) the elements are initialises to the default values for the primitive data type (float in this case - 0.0), so f1 will contain 10 elements each with a value of 0.0. f2 has been declared but has not been initialised, it has the ability to reference or point to an array but as yet does not point to any array. f2 = f1; copies the reference (pointer/memory address) of f1 into f2 so now f2 points at the array pointed to by f1.

This means that the values returned by f2 are the values returned by f1. Changes to f1 are also changes to f2 because both f1 and f2 point to the same array.

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3.

class A 
{ 
    A( ) { } 
} 

class B extends A 
{ }
Which statement is true?

A.
Class B'S constructor is public.
B.
Class B'S constructor has no arguments.
C.
Class B'S constructor includes a call to this( ).
D.
None of these.

Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

Correct Answer: Option B

Explanation:

Option B is correct. Class B inherits Class A's constructor which has no arguments.

Option A is wrong. Class B inherits Class A's constructor which uses default access.

Option C is wrong. There is just no implicit call to this( ).

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4.

/* Missing statements ? */
public class NewTreeSet extends java.util.TreeSet
{
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        java.util.TreeSet t = new java.util.TreeSet();
        t.clear();
    }
    public void clear() 
    {
        TreeMap m = new TreeMap();
        m.clear();
    }
}
which two statements, added independently at beginning of the program, allow the code to compile?
  1. No statement is required
  2. import java.util.*;
  3. import.java.util.Tree*;
  4. import java.util.TreeSet;
  5. import java.util.TreeMap;

A.
1 only
B.
2 and 5
C.
3 and 4
D.
3 and 5

Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

Correct Answer: Option B

Explanation:

(2) and (5). TreeMap is the only class that must be imported. TreeSet does not need an import statement because it is described with a fully qualified name.

(1) is incorrect because TreeMap must be imported. (3) is incorrect syntax for an import statement. (4) is incorrect because it will not import TreeMap, which is required.

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5.

What will be the output of the program?

class Two 
{
    byte x;
}

class PassO 
{
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        PassO p = new PassO();
        p.start();
    }

    void start() 
    {
        Two t = new Two();
        System.out.print(t.x + " ");
        Two t2 = fix(t);
        System.out.println(t.x + " " + t2.x);
    }

    Two fix(Two tt) 
    {
        tt.x = 42;
        return tt;
    }
}

A.
null null 42
B.
0 0 42
C.
0 42 42
D.
0 0 0

Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

Correct Answer: Option C

Explanation:

In the fix() method, the reference variable tt refers to the same object (class Two) as the t reference variable. Updating tt.x in the fix() method updates t.x (they are one in the same object). Remember also that the instance variable x in the Two class is initialized to 0.

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6.

What will be the output of the program?

public class If2 
{
    static boolean b1, b2;
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        int x = 0;
        if ( !b1 ) /* Line 7 */
        {
            if ( !b2 ) /* Line 9 */
            {
                b1 = true;
                x++;
                if ( 5 > 6 ) 
                {
                    x++;
                }
                if ( !b1 ) 
                    x = x + 10;
                else if ( b2 = true ) /* Line 19 */
                    x = x + 100;
                else if ( b1 | b2 ) /* Line 21 */
                    x = x + 1000;
            }
        }
        System.out.println(x);
    }
}

A.
0
B.
1
C.
101
D.
111

Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

Correct Answer: Option C

Explanation:

As instance variables, b1 and b2 are initialized to false. The if tests on lines 7 and 9 are successful so b1 is set to true and x is incremented. The next if test to succeed is on line 19 (note that the code is not testing to see if b2 is true, it is setting b2 to be true). Since line 19 was successful, subsequent else-if's (line 21) will be skipped.

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7.

What will be the output of the program?

public class If1 
{
    static boolean b;
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        short hand = 42;
        if ( hand < 50 && !b ) /* Line 7 */
            hand++;
        if ( hand > 50 );     /* Line 9 */
        else if ( hand > 40 ) 
        {
            hand += 7;
            hand++;    
        }
        else
            --hand;
        System.out.println(hand);
    }
}

A.
41
B.
42
C.
50
D.
51

Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

Correct Answer: Option D

Explanation:

In Java, boolean instance variables are initialized to false, so the if test on line 7 is true and hand is incremented. Line 9 is legal syntax, a do nothing statement. The else-if is true so hand has 7 added to it and is then incremented.

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8.

What will be the output of the program?

int i = 0; 
while(1) 
{
    if(i == 4) 
    {
        break;
    } 
    ++i; 
} 
System.out.println("i = " + i);

A.
i = 0
B.
i = 3
C.
i = 4
D.
Compilation fails.

Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

Correct Answer: Option D

Explanation:

Compilation fails because the argument of the while loop, the condition, must be of primitive type boolean. In Java, 1 does not represent the true state of a boolean, rather it is seen as an integer.

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9.

What will be the output of the program?

int i = 0, j = 5; 
tp: for (;;) 
    {
        i++;  
        for (;;) 
        {
            if(i > --j) 
            {
                break tp; 
            } 
        } 
        System.out.println("i =" + i + ", j = " + j);

A.
i = 1, j = 0
B.
i = 1, j = 4
C.
i = 3, j = 4
D.
Compilation fails.

Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

Correct Answer: Option D

Explanation:

If you examine the code carefully you will notice a missing curly bracket at the end of the code, this would cause the code to fail.

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10.

What will be the output of the program?

int I = 0;
label:
    if (I < 2) {
    System.out.print("I is " + I);
    I++;
    continue label;
}

A.
I is 0
B.
I is 0 I is 1
C.
Compilation fails.
D.
None of the above

Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

Correct Answer: Option C

Explanation:

The code will not compile because a continue statement can only occur in a looping construct. If this syntax were legal, the combination of the continue and the if statements would create a kludgey kind of loop, but the compiler will force you to write cleaner code than this.

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11.

What will be the output of the program?

try 
{ 
    int x = 0; 
    int y = 5 / x; 
} 
catch (Exception e) 
{
    System.out.println("Exception"); 
} 
catch (ArithmeticException ae) 
{
    System.out.println(" Arithmetic Exception"); 
} 
System.out.println("finished");

A.
finished
B.
Exception
C.
Compilation fails.
D.
Arithmetic Exception

Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

Correct Answer: Option C

Explanation:

Compilation fails because ArithmeticException has already been caught. ArithmeticException is a subclass of java.lang.Exception, by time the ArithmeticException has been specified it has already been caught by the Exception class.

If ArithmeticException appears before Exception, then the file will compile. When catching exceptions the more specific exceptions must be listed before the more general (the subclasses must be caught before the superclasses).

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12.

Which statement is true?

A.
A try statement must have at least one corresponding catch block.
B.
Multiple catch statements can catch the same class of exception more than once.
C.
An Error that might be thrown in a method must be declared as thrown by that method, or be handled within that method.
D.
Except in case of VM shutdown, if a try block starts to execute, a corresponding finally block will always start to execute.

Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

Correct Answer: Option D

Explanation:

A is wrong. A try statement can exist without catch, but it must have a finally statement.

B is wrong. A try statement executes a block. If a value is thrown and the try statement has one or more catch clauses that can catch it, then control will be transferred to the first such catch clause. If that catch block completes normally, then the try statement completes normally.

C is wrong. Exceptions of type Error and RuntimeException do not have to be caught, only checked exceptions (java.lang.Exception) have to be caught. However, speaking of Exceptions, Exceptions do not have to be handled in the same method as the throw statement. They can be passed to another method.

If you put a finally block after a try and its associated catch blocks, then once execution enters the try block, the code in that finally block will definitely be executed except in the following circumstances:

  1. An exception arising in the finally block itself.
  2. The death of the thread.
  3. The use of System.exit()
  4. Turning off the power to the CPU.
I suppose the last three could be classified as VM shutdown.

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13.

class Test1 
{
    public int value;
    public int hashCode() { return 42; }
}
class Test2 
{
    public int value;
    public int hashcode() { return (int)(value^5); }
}
which statement is true?

A.
class Test1 will not compile.
B.
The Test1 hashCode() method is more efficient than the Test2 hashCode() method.
C.
The Test1 hashCode() method is less efficient than the Test2 hashCode() method.
D.
class Test2 will not compile.

Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

Correct Answer: Option C

Explanation:

The so-called "hashing algorithm" implemented by class Test1 will always return the same value, 42, which is legal but which will place all of the hash table entries into a single bucket, the most inefficient setup possible.

Option A and D are incorrect because these classes are legal.

Option B is incorrect based on the logic described above.

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14.

What will be the output of the program?

public class Foo 
{
    Foo() 
    {
        System.out.print("foo");
    }
    
class Bar
{
    Bar() 
    {
        System.out.print("bar");
    }
    public void go() 
    {
        System.out.print("hi");
    }
} /* class Bar ends */

    public static void main (String [] args) 
    {
        Foo f = new Foo();
        f.makeBar();
    }
    void makeBar() 
    {
        (new Bar() {}).go();
    }
}/* class Foo ends */

A.
Compilation fails.
B.
An error occurs at runtime.
C.
It prints "foobarhi"
D.
It prints "barhi"

Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

Correct Answer: Option C

Explanation:

Option C is correct because first the Foo instance is created, which means the Foo constructor runs and prints "foo". Next, the makeBar() method is invoked which creates a Bar, which means the Bar constructor runs and prints "bar", and finally the go() method is invoked on the new Bar instance, which means the go() method prints "hi".

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15.

class Bar { } 
class Test 
{  
    Bar doBar() 
    {
        Bar b = new Bar(); /* Line 6 */
        return b; /* Line 7 */
    } 
    public static void main (String args[]) 
    { 
        Test t = new Test();  /* Line 11 */
        Bar newBar = t.doBar();  /* Line 12 */
        System.out.println("newBar"); 
        newBar = new Bar(); /* Line 14 */
        System.out.println("finishing"); /* Line 15 */
    } 
}
At what point is the Bar object, created on line 6, eligible for garbage collection?

A.
after line 12
B.
after line 14
C.
after line 7, when doBar() completes
D.
after line 15, when main() completes

Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

Correct Answer: Option B

Explanation:

Option B is correct. All references to the Bar object created on line 6 are destroyed when a new reference to a new Bar object is assigned to the variable newBar on line 14. Therefore the Bar object, created on line 6, is eligible for garbage collection after line 14.

Option A is wrong. This actually protects the object from garbage collection.

Option C is wrong. Because the reference in the doBar() method is returned on line 7 and is stored in newBar on line 12. This preserver the object created on line 6.

Option D is wrong. Not applicable because the object is eligible for garbage collection after line 14.

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16.

class Test 
{  
    private Demo d; 
    void start() 
    {  
        d = new Demo(); 
        this.takeDemo(d); /* Line 7 */
    } /* Line 8 */
    void takeDemo(Demo demo) 
    { 
        demo = null;  
        demo = new Demo(); 
    } 
}
When is the Demo object eligible for garbage collection?

A.
After line 7
B.
After line 8
C.
After the start() method completes
D.
When the instance running this code is made eligible for garbage collection.

Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

Correct Answer: Option D

Explanation:

Option D is correct. By a process of elimination.

Option A is wrong. The variable d is a member of the Test class and is never directly set to null.

Option B is wrong. A copy of the variable d is set to null and not the actual variable d.

Option C is wrong. The variable d exists outside the start() method (it is a class member). So, when the start() method finishes the variable d still holds a reference.

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17.

public class X 
{
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        X x = new X();
        X x2 = m1(x); /* Line 6 */
        X x4 = new X();
        x2 = x4; /* Line 8 */
        doComplexStuff();
    }
    static X m1(X mx) 
    {
        mx = new X();
        return mx;
    }
}
After line 8 runs. how many objects are eligible for garbage collection?

A.
0  
B.
1
C.
2
D.
3

Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

Correct Answer: Option B

Explanation:

By the time line 8 has run, the only object without a reference is the one generated as a result of line 6. Remember that "Java is pass by value," so the reference variable x is not affected by the m1() method.

Ref: http://www.javaworld.com/javaworld/javaqa/2000-05/03-qa-0526-pass.html

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18.

public class Test 
{ 
    public void foo() 
    {
        assert false; /* Line 5 */
        assert false; /* Line 6 */
    } 
    public void bar()
    {
        while(true)
        {
            assert false; /* Line 12 */
        } 
        assert false;  /* Line 14 */
    } 
}
What causes compilation to fail?

A.
Line 5
B.
Line 6
C.
Line 12
D.
Line 14

Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

Correct Answer: Option D

Explanation:

Option D is correct. Compilation fails because of an unreachable statement at line 14. It is a compile-time error if a statement cannot be executed because it is unreachable. The question is now, why is line 20 unreachable? If it is because of the assert then surely line 6 would also be unreachable. The answer must be something other than assert.

Examine the following:

A while statement can complete normally if and only if at least one of the following is true:

- The while statement is reachable and the condition expression is not a constant expression with value true.

-There is a reachable break statement that exits the while statement.

The while statement at line 11 is infinite and there is no break statement therefore line 14 is unreachable. You can test this with the following code:

public class Test80 
{ 
    public void foo() 
    {
        assert false; 
        assert false; 
    } 
    public void bar()
    {
        while(true)
        {
            assert false; 
            break; 
        } 
        assert false;  
    } 
}

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19.

What will be the output of the program?

public class SqrtExample 
{
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        double value = -9.0;
        System.out.println( Math.sqrt(value));
    }
}

A.
3.0
B.
-3.0
C.
NaN
D.
Compilation fails.

Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

Correct Answer: Option C

Explanation:

The sqrt() method returns NaN (not a number) when it's argument is less than zero.

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20.

What will be the output of the program?

String a = "newspaper";
a = a.substring(5,7);
char b = a.charAt(1);
a = a + b;
System.out.println(a);

A.
apa
B.
app
C.
apea
D.
apep

Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

Correct Answer: Option B

Explanation:

Both substring() and charAt() methods are indexed with a zero-base, and substring() returns a String of length arg2 - arg1.

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