Online C Programming Test - C Programming Test 7



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Instruction:

  • Total number of questions : 20.
  • Time alloted : 20 minutes.
  • Each question carry 1 mark, no negative marks.
  • DO NOT refresh the page.
  • All the best :-).

1.

A short integer is at least 16 bits wide and a long integer is at least 32 bits wide.

A.
True
B.
False

Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

Correct Answer: Option A

Explanation:

The basic C compiler is 16 bit compiler, below are the size of it's data types
The size of short int is 2 bytes wide(16 bits).
The size of long int is 4 bytes wide(32 bits).

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2.

Which of the following correctly shows the hierarchy of arithmetic operations in C?

A.
/ + * -
B.
* - / +
C.
+ - / *
D.
/ * + -

Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

Correct Answer: Option D

Explanation:

Simply called as BODMAS (Bracket of Division, Multiplication, Addition and Subtraction).

How Do I Remember ? BODMAS !

  • B - Brackets first
  • O - Orders (ie Powers and Square Roots, etc.)
  • DM - Division and Multiplication (left-to-right)
  • AS - Addition and Subtraction (left-to-right)
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    3.

    In which order do the following gets evaluated
    1. Relational
    2. Arithmetic
    3. Logical
    4. Assignment

    A.
    2134
    B.
    1234
    C.
    4321
    D.
    3214

    Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

    Correct Answer: Option A

    Explanation:

    2. Arithmetic operators: *, /, %, +, -
    1. Relational operators: >, <, >=, <=, ==, !=
    3. Logical operators : !, &&, ||
    4. Assignment operators: =

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    4.

    Associativity has no role to play unless the precedence of operator is same.

    A.
    True
    B.
    False

    Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

    Correct Answer: Option A

    Explanation:

    Associativity is only needed when the operators in an expression have the same precedence. Usually + and - have the same precedence.

    Consider the expression 7 - 4 + 2. The result could be either (7 - 4) + 2 = 5 or 7 - (4 + 2) = 1. The former result corresponds to the case when + and - are left-associative, the latter to when + and - are right-associative.

    Usually the addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division operators are left-associative, while the exponentiation, assignment and conditional operators are right-associative. To prevent cases where operands would be associated with two operators, or no operator at all, operators with the same precedence must have the same associativity.

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    5.

    If the binary eauivalent of 5.375 in normalised form is 0100 0000 1010 1100 0000 0000 0000 0000, what will be the output of the program (on intel machine)?

    #include<stdio.h>
    #include<math.h>
    int main()
    {
        float a=5.375;
        char *p;
        int i;
        p = (char*)&a;
        for(i=0; i<=3; i++)
            printf("%02x\n", (unsigned char)p[i]);
        return 0;
    }
    

    A.
    40 AC 00 00
    B.
    04 CA 00 00
    C.
    00 00 AC 40
    D.
    00 00 CA 04

    Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

    Correct Answer: Option C

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    6.

    A float occupies 4 bytes. If the hexadecimal equivalent of these 4 bytes are A, B, C and D, then when this float is stored in memory in which of the following order do these bytes gets stored?

    A.
    ABCD
    B.
    DCBA
    C.
    0xABCD
    D.
    Depends on big endian or little endian architecture

    Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

    Correct Answer: Option D

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    7.

    What will be the output of the program?

    #include<stdio.h>
    int sumdig(int);
    int main()
    {
        int a, b;
        a = sumdig(123);
        b = sumdig(123);
        printf("%d, %d\n", a, b);
        return 0;
    }
    int sumdig(int n)
    {
        int s, d;
        if(n!=0)
        {
            d = n%10;
            n = n/10;
            s = d+sumdig(n);
        }
        else
            return 0;
        return s;
    }
    

    A.
    4, 4
    B.
    3, 3
    C.
    6, 6
    D.
    12, 12

    Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

    Correct Answer: Option C

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    8.

    Point out the error in the program

    
    f(int a, int b)
    {
        int a;
        a = 20;
        return a;
    }
    

    A.
    Missing parenthesis in return statement
    B.
    The function should be defined as int f(int a, int b)
    C.
    Redeclaration of a
    D.
    None of above

    Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

    Correct Answer: Option C

    Explanation:

    f(int a, int b) The variable a is declared in the function argument statement.

    int a; Here again we are declaring the variable a. Hence it shows the error "Redeclaration of a"

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    9.

    What will be the output of the program?

    #include<stdio.h>
    #define SQUARE(x) x*x
    
    int main()
    {
        float s=10, u=30, t=2, a;
        a = 2*(s-u*t)/SQUARE(t);
        printf("Result = %f", a);
        return 0;
    }
    

    A.
    Result = -100.000000
    B.
    Result = -25.000000
    C.
    Result = 0.000000
    D.
    Result = 100.000000

    Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

    Correct Answer: Option A

    Explanation:

    The macro function SQUARE(x) x*x calculate the square of the given number 'x'. (Eg: 102)

    Step 1: float s=10, u=30, t=2, a; Here the variable s, u, t, a are declared as an floating point type and the variable s, u, t are initialized to 10, 30, 2.

    Step 2: a = 2*(s-u*t)/SQUARE(t); becomes,

    => a = 2 * (10 - 30 * 2) / t * t; Here SQUARE(t) is replaced by macro to t*t .

    => a = 2 * (10 - 30 * 2) / 2 * 2;

    => a = 2 * (10 - 60) / 2 * 2;

    => a = 2 * (-50) / 2 * 2 ;

    => a = 2 * (-25) * 2 ;

    => a = (-50) * 2 ;

    => a = -100;

    Step 3: printf("Result=%f", a); It prints the value of variable 'a'.

    Hence the output of the program is -100

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    10.

    Preprocessor directive #undef can be used only on a macro that has been #define earlier

    A.
    True
    B.
    False

    Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

    Correct Answer: Option A

    Explanation:

    True, #undef can be used only on a macro that has been #define earlier

    Example: #define PI 3.14

    We can undefine PI macro by #undef PI

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    11.

    Which statement will you add to the following program to ensure that the program outputs "IndiaBIX" on execution?

    #include<stdio.h>
    
    int main()
    {
        char s[] = "IndiaBIX";
        char t[25];
        char *ps, *pt;
        ps = s;
        pt = t;
        while(*ps)
            *pt++ = *ps++;
    
        /* Add a statement here */
        printf("%s\n", t);
        return 0;
    }
    

    A.
    *pt='';
    B.
    pt='\0';
    C.
    pt='\n';
    D.
    *pt='\0';

    Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

    Correct Answer: Option D

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    12.

    What will be the output of the program ?

    #include<stdio.h>
    #include<string.h>
    
    int main()
    {
        char str1[20] = "Hello", str2[20] = " World";
        printf("%s\n", strcpy(str2, strcat(str1, str2)));
        return 0;
    }
    

    A.
    Hello
    B.
    World
    C.
    Hello World
    D.
    WorldHello

    Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

    Correct Answer: Option C

    Explanation:

    Step 1: char str1[20] = "Hello", str2[20] = " World"; The variable str1 and str2 is declared as an array of characters and initialized with value "Hello" and " World" respectively.

    Step 2: printf("%s\n", strcpy(str2, strcat(str1, str2)));

    => strcat(str1, str2)) it append the string str2 to str1. The result will be stored in str1. Therefore str1 contains "Hello World".

    => strcpy(str2, "Hello World") it copies the "Hello World" to the variable str2.

    Hence it prints "Hello World".

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    13.

    What will be the output of the program ?

    #include<stdio.h>
    
    int main()
    {
        char p[] = "%d\n";
        p[1] = 'c';
        printf(p, 65);
        return 0;
    }
    

    A.
    A
    B.
    a
    C.
    c
    D.
    65

    Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

    Correct Answer: Option A

    Explanation:

    Step 1: char p[] = "%d\n"; The variable p is declared as an array of characters and initialized with string "%d".

    Step 2: p[1] = 'c'; Here, we overwrite the second element of array p by 'c'. So array p becomes "%c".

    Step 3: printf(p, 65); becomes printf("%c", 65);

    Therefore it prints the ASCII value of 65. The output is 'A'.

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    14.

    What will be the output of the program ?

    #include<stdio.h>
    void swap(char *, char *);
    
    int main()
    {
        char *pstr[2] = {"Hello", "IndiaBIX"};
        swap(pstr[0], pstr[1]);
        printf("%s\n%s", pstr[0], pstr[1]);
        return 0;
    }
    void swap(char *t1, char *t2)
    {
        char *t;
        t=t1;
        t1=t2;
        t2=t;
    }
    

    A.
    IndiaBIX
    Hello
    B.
    Address of "Hello" and "IndiaBIX"
    C.
    Hello
    IndiaBIX
    D.
    Iello
    HndiaBIX

    Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

    Correct Answer: Option C

    Explanation:

    Step 1: void swap(char *, char *); This prototype tells the compiler that the function swap accept two strings as arguments and it does not return anything.

    Step 2: char *pstr[2] = {"Hello", "IndiaBIX"}; The variable pstr is declared as an pointer to the array of strings. It is initialized to

    pstr[0] = "Hello", pstr[1] = "IndiaBIX"

    Step 3: swap(pstr[0], pstr[1]); The swap function is called by "call by value". Hence it does not affect the output of the program.

    If the swap function is "called by reference" it will affect the variable pstr.

    Step 4: printf("%s\n%s", pstr[0], pstr[1]); It prints the value of pstr[0] and pstr[1].

    Hence the output of the program is

    Hello
    IndiaBIX

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    15.

    What will be the output of the program ?

    #include<stdio.h>
    
    int main()
    {
        union var
        {
            int a, b;
        };
        union var v;
        v.a=10;
        v.b=20;
        printf("%d\n", v.a);
        return 0;
    }
    

    A.
    10
    B.
    20
    C.
    30
    D.
    0

    Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

    Correct Answer: Option B

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    16.

    Nested unions are allowed

    A.
    True
    B.
    False

    Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

    Correct Answer: Option A

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    17.

    Can we have an array of bit fields?

    A.
    Yes
    B.
    No

    Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

    Correct Answer: Option B

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    18.

    To scan a and b given below, which of the following scanf() statement will you use?

    #include<stdio.h>
    
    float a;
    double b;
    

    A.
    scanf("%f %f", &a, &b);
    B.
    scanf("%Lf %Lf", &a, &b);
    C.
    scanf("%f %Lf", &a, &b);
    D.
    scanf("%f %lf", &a, &b);

    Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

    Correct Answer: Option D

    Explanation:

    To scan a float value, %f is used as format specifier.

    To scan a double value, %lf is used as format specifier.

    Therefore, the answer is scanf("%f %lf", &a, &b);

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    19.

    What will be the output of the program?

    #define P printf("%d\n", -1^~0);
    #define M(P) int main()\
                 {\
                    P\
                    return 0;\
                 }
    M(P)
    

    A.
    1
    B.
    0
    C.
    -1
    D.
    2

    Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

    Correct Answer: Option B

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    20.

    What will be the output of the program?

    #include<stdio.h>
    
    int main()
    {
        unsigned int res;
        res = (64 >>(2+1-2)) & (~(1<<2));
        printf("%d\n", res);
        return 0;
    }
    

    A.
    32
    B.
    64
    C.
    0
    D.
    128

    Your Answer: Option (Not Answered)

    Correct Answer: Option A

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